NeuroIS fNIRS Lab

Our NeuroIS Lab is equipped with the neuroimaging method of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). fNIRS allows us to measure neural cortical activity of the human (or animal) brain. This enables us to measure critical processes in decision making, cognitive processing of information and emotional (neural) responses. These measurements go beyond the usual research methods of business information systems in the sense of observations, interviews, and questionnaires and thus, they provide a deeper understanding of human information processing.

What fNIRS actually measures:

fNIRS uses the ability to send light through tissue. Thereby, light of specific wavelengths is reflected by oxygenated hemoglobin or absorbed by deoxygenated hemoglobin. The reflected or absorbed light can be recorded with detectors, which allows us to calculate the oxygen contained in the blood. This provides an accurate measurement of local neural activity, since increased oxygen levels are an indicator for increased neural activity of the given area. In order to reach the cortical brain regions without too much light being reflected by extracerebral tissue, the sources and detectors of fNIRS should be approximately 30 mm apart. In order to intercept light which is reflected on the surface due to the blood circulation of skin and bone, and to filter it out as an interfering signal, so-called short channels are can be used. At the same time, short channels also serve as detectors, but with the difference that they should have a maximum distance of 10 mm from the sources to make sure only extra-cerebral light is received.

By using light and the associated measurement of hemoglobin, fNIRS measures so-called hemodynamic responses to shown stimuli. This is the same phenomenon as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), but unlike fMRI, fNIRS can be used in a natural environment. This is particularly advantageous for IS, since effects are often not independent and isolated from each other.

Studienablauf und Studienteilnahme

An unseren Studien teilnehmen und jedes mal 10€ verdienen.

Info für Studierende - Probanden gesucht!

In unserem Lab führen wir viele verschiedene Studien durch und dafür brauchen wir natürlich immer auch Probanden! Und hier kommt ihr ins Spiel - an unseren Studien kann grundsätzlich jeder teilnehmen. Bei Teilnahme bekommt ihr die Zeit die ihr aufwendet natürlich auch entgolten - dabei lehnt sich die Höhe der Bezahlung an die Dauer der Studie an. Wenn ihr z.B. 45-60 Minuten teilnehmen müsst, so bekommt ihr eine Vergütung von 10€ dafür.

Wie unsere Studien grundsätzlich ablaufen:

 

Ein paar Beispiele zu den Aufgaben, die ihr in unseren Studien machen müsst:

  • Ihr schaut euch verschiedene Webseiten an und bewertet diese anhand bestimmter Kriterien
  • Oder ihr benutzt eine Webseite, um online etwas einzukaufen
  • Oder ihr bekommt die Aufgabe, etwas auswendig zu lernen mit verschiedenen Medien, um zu schauen welches Medium euch besser beim lernen unterstützt
  • Oder ihr schaut euch Bilder oder Videos zu Robotern an und dürft diese bewerte.

 

Um Proband zu werden müsst ihr euch nur in das folgende Formular eintragen und schon seid ihr dabei!

Jetzt zum fNIRS Lab Proband werden, an Studien teilnehmen und abkassieren!

Technische Lab Ausstattung und Anwendungsgebiete

Technical specifications of the lab:

  • Mobile NIRSport from NIRX with 8 sources & 8 detectors, plus additional 8 short-channel detectors
  • All optodes can be equipped with spring-loaded optode holders
  • Wavelengths of light are 760nm and 850nm
  • Sampling rate is 7.81Hz
  • For recording, a Lenovo ThinkPad (Intel i5 @1.8GHz, 16GB RAM) with appropriate software is available (NIRStar, NIRSite, nirsLab, NIRStim, Matlab Brain AnalyzIR Toolbox, Homer2)

Fields of application (examples):

  • Measuring the effect of graphical user interfaces on users with different foci, e.g. trust, user experience, cognitive load etc.
  • Measurement of mobile applications in their context (e.g. apps), as we have a mobile fNIRS that can be used with backpack
  • Consequently, customer reactions and experiences in physical stores could be measured to improve the store layout with this data
  • It would also be possible to measure interpersonal actions, for example in IT project management teams

Current research projects:

eLearning

eLearning methods & their effectiveness in the context of enterprise systems: In this project’s context, the processing of eLearning content in the brain is to be reproduced with the help of fNIRS. This should improve the efficiency and effectiveness of certain learning methods for the context of enterprise systems training by observing the human learning processes on a neural level.

(Your contact person for this: Mareen Wienand)

 

User Experience:

User Experience & information processing of graphical user interfaces: At this point, we investigate the effects of certain design characteristics of graphical user interfaces. The current focus lies on ecommerce websites and their graphical design. We also differentiate between the first impression and the first use, as well as investigate to what extent expectations change after the first use. In addition to user surveys and questionnaires, fNIRS is used to collect data which provide more in-depth insights into human information processing.

(Your contact for this: Anika Nissen)

 

Consumer Experience:

Digital Customer Experience & In-Store Experience: in the frame of this project, we investigate both online and offline customer experiences, for example while customers are visiting a website or strolling through a store in the city. Due to the mobility of the fNIRS, both use cases are possible, which allows us to conduct optimal field research. This helps us to measure the use of digital nudges on websites, or digital signages or nudges in supermarkets and thus, evaluate their effectiveness.

 

 

Social cognitive processing in Human-Robot Interactions:

Social cognitive processing in Human-Robot Interactions: In this research project, we investigate social categorizations and possible bias humans have against social robots. These processes might further heavily impact our interactions with robots. First, preliminary results in studies without fNIRS have already pointed to possible differences in the perceptions of robots and humans. Consequently, follow-up research including neural measurements by means of fNIRS are planned to gain deeper insights into general social processing of robots, the theory of mind, and the uncanny valley effect in human-robot interactions.

(Your contact person for this is Anika Nissen in cooperation with Katharina Jahn from University Siegen)

 

 

Publications:

Filter:
  • Nissen, A.: Psychological and Physiological Effects of Color Use on eCommerce Websites: a Neural Study Using fNIRS. In: International Conference on Information Systems (ICIS). Hyderabad, India 2020. CitationDetails

    Colors surround us in all life situations and have the power to influence our mood and emotions, which makes color a crucial impact factor for decision making in ecommerce environments. Therefore, this research paper aims to explore the psychological and physiological effects of color use on websites with a neuroimaging method. For this, an experiment was designed in which 24 healthy participants watched an online shoe shop in 4 different colored versions during which their neural activity in the prefrontal cortex was measured. While comparing the neural activity between the different employed colors, distinct implications can be derived. That is, in comparison to the blueish website, (1) grey scaled websites require higher cognitive load but are rated as aesthetically pleasing, (2) greenish websites result in more negative valence while they require not more neural resources, and (3) reddish websites are rated low in valence and require higher neural processing resources.

  • Jahn, K.; Nissen, A.: Towards Dual Processing of Social Robots: Differences in the Automatic and Reflective System. In: International Conference on Information Systems (ICIS). Hyderabad, India 2020. CitationDetails

    Social robots increasingly diffuse into our lives in work, health, and many other areas. However, theoretical approaches that explain how social robots should be designed to maximize experiential and performance-related outcomes in human-robot interaction (HRI) are still rare. To close this research gap, we aim to develop a dual process model of HRI with the help of two experiments. Results of the first experiment show that individuals categorize humans and robots differently in the automatic and reflective system, leading to different forms of robotic biases in these systems. Specifically, whereas humans show a bias against all types of robots in the reflective system, they only show biases against robots with low anthropomorphism in the automatic system. With the second experiment, we aim to complement these results from a neurophysiological perspective to gain more insights into cognitive processes during classification and evaluation of robots.

  • Nissen, A.: Why We Love Blue Hues on Websites: a fNIRS Investigation of Color and Its Impact on the Neural Processing of eCommerce Websites. In: Davis, F. D.; Riedl, R.; vom Brocke, J.; Léger, P-M.; Randolph, A.; Fischer, T. (Ed.): NeuroIS Retreat. Wien 2020. CitationDetails

    Blue of all colors seems to be generally preferred by humans and animals. Consequently, the use of this color in ecommerce context has several positive effects such as increased trustworthiness and aesthetic ratings. These effects are, in this study, hypothesized to be caused by specific neural processes in the prefrontal cortex of human decision makers. Consequently, this study tackles the research question whether there is a distinct neural activation pattern for blue websites that helps to explain why blue is often most favored. To investigate this, one website is designed and manipulated in col-or to which user reactions are measured by employing functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). The results of this study show that blue colored websites seem to require generally less processing power related to cognitive while revealing increases in brain structures related to processing pleasant and aesthetic stimuli.
     

  • Nissen, A.; Krampe, C.: Exploring Gender Differences on eCommerce Websites: A Behavioral and Neural Approach Utilizing fNIRS. In: Davis, F. D.; Riedl, R.; vom Brocke, J.; Léger, P-M.; Randolph, A.; Fischer, T. (Ed.): NeuroIS Retreat. Wien 2020. CitationDetails

    Whether males and females evaluate ecommerce websites differently has long been discussed and has resulted in inconsistent research findings. While some studies identified gender differences in the evaluation of websites, other studies indicate that these differences are inexistent. To shed light on these hypothetical gender differences on ecommerce website perceptions, a behavioral and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) experiment in which participants had to use and evaluate three different ecommerce websites was conducted. While the questionnaire-based behavioral results showed no significant differences between gender, neural gender differences could be discovered. In particular, well rated websites resulted in increased neural activity for men in brain regions of the dlPFC and vlPFC in the left hemisphere, while the lower evaluated websites resulted in an increased neural activity in brain regions of the vmPFC for men in the right hemisphere. Consequently, the results suggest that men seem to require higher neural activity for the emotional appraisal of, and decision making on ecommerce websites.

  • Nissen, Anika; Krampe, Caspar; Kenning, Peter; Schütte, Reinhard: Utilizing Mobile fNIRS to Investigate Neural Correlates of the TAM in eCommerce. In: International Conference for Information Systems (ICIS) (2019). CitationDetails
  • Nissen, A.: Exploring the Neural Correlates of Visual Aesthetics on Websites. In: Davis, Fred D.; Riedl, René; vom Brocke, Jan; Léger, Pierre-Majorique; Randolph, Adriane; Fischer, Thomas (Ed.): Information Systems and Neuroscience. 1st Edition. Springer, Cham 2020, p. 211-220. doi:10.1007/978-3-030-28144-1_23CitationDetails

News:

 Mon, 08. Jun. 2020   Busch, Jan

Anika Nissen nimmt mit zwei Vorträgen an virtueller NeuroIS-Konferenz teil

Zwei eingereichte Beiträge von Anika Nissen wurden erfolgreich auf der diesjährigen NeuroIS-Retreat-Konferenz akzeptiert. Aufgrund der aktuellen Lage durch Covid-19 findet die Konferenz dieses Jahr virtuell über Microsoft Teams statt. Dabei treffen sich jährlich Wirtschaftsinformatiker, Betriebswirtschaftler und Neurowissenschaftler zum Austausch für NeuroIS bezogenen Themen. Wir freuen uns, dass unsere Beiträge zur Farbgestaltung bei Webseiten und neuronalen, geschlechtsspezifischen Unterschieden in der Informationsverarbeitung von Webseiten auf der Konferenz angenommen wurden und wir diese dort der Community präsentieren konnten. Nachfolgend sind die Abstracts der Vorträge zu finden:

"Why We Love Blue Hues on Websites : A FNIRS Investigation of Color and Its Impact on the Neural Processing of E-Commerce Websites"

Blue of all colors seems to be generally preferred by humans and animals. Consequently, the use of this color in ecommerce context has several positive effects such as increased trustworthiness and aesthetic ratings. These effects are, in this study, hypothesized to be caused by specific neural processes in the prefrontal cortex of human decision makers. Consequently, this study tackles the research question whether there is a distinct neural activation pattern for blue websites that helps to explain why blue is often most favored. To investigate this, one website is designed and manipulated in col-or to which user reactions are measured by employing functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). The results of this study show that blue colored websites seem to require generally less processing power related to cognitive while revealing increases in brain structures related to processing pleasant and aesthetic stimuli.

"Exploring Gender Differences on E-Commerce Websites : A Behavioral and Neural Approach Utilizing FNIRS"

Whether males and females evaluate ecommerce websites differently has long been discussed and has resulted in inconsistent research findings. While some studies identified gender differences in the evaluation of websites, other studies indicate that these differences are inexistent. To shed light on these hypothetical gender differences on ecommerce website perceptions, a behavioral and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) experiment in which participants had to use and evaluate three different ecommerce websites was conducted. While the questionnaire-based behavioral results showed no significant differences between gender, neural gender differences could be discovered. In particular, well rated websites resulted in increased neural activity for men in brain regions of the dlPFC and vlPFC in the left hemisphere, while the lower evaluated websites resulted in an increased neural activity in brain regions of the vmPFC for men in the right hemisphere. Consequently, the results suggest that men seem to require higher neural activity for the emotional appraisal of, and decision making on ecommerce websites.

Auch möchten wir hiermit nochmal den Veranstaltern für die hervorragende virtuelle Umsetzung der Konferenz danken.

 Thu, 30. Jan. 2020   Seufert, Sarah

Engagement in der NeuroIS-Forschung durch innovatives Forschungsgerät fNIRS

Zum Zweck der Forschung im innovativen Spannungsfeld zwischen Wirtschaftsinformatik und Neurowissenschaft hat der Lehrstuhl ein Forschungsgerät angeschaft. Genauer handelt es sich hierbei um eine funktionalen Nahinfrarotspektroskopie (fNIRS). Mit dieser können Hirnbereich mit erhöhter Aktvitität bei z.B. bestimmten Aufgaben, bestimmten Softwareprogrammen, bestimmten Webseiten etc. gemessen und analysiert werden. Dabei versucht diese Forschung nicht nur bestehende Phänomene, die üblicherweise mit Fragebögen gemessen werden, besser zu erklären, sondern auch über bestimmte Aktivierungsmuster Prognosen über Nutzerverhalten aufzustellen.

Mehr Infos zur Funktionsweise der fNIRS und unserer Ausstattung findet ihr hier: fNIRS LAB

 Thu, 30. Jan. 2020   Seufert, Sarah

IIS-Lehrstuhl auf der ICIS 2019 vertreten

Unsere Mitarbeiterin Anika Nissen ist zur ICIS 2019 gereist, um dort ihr Paper „Utilizing Mobile fNIRS to Investigate Neural Correlates of the TAM in eCommerce“ vorzustellen. In dem vorgestellten Paper geht es inhaltlich um die Messung der Nutzerakzeptanz mit den Konstrukten der wahrgenommenen Nützlichkeit und Einfachheit der Nutzung. Die Messung findet hier jedoch nicht subjektiv mit Hilfe von Fragebögen statt, sondern direkt am menschlichen Gehirn mithilfe der funktionalen Nahinfrarotspektroskopie (fNIRS).

Die ICIS ist dabei die größte, internationale Konferenz für Wirtschaftsinformatik, auf der sich alle bekannten Wirtschaftsinformatiker zum wissenschaftlichen Diskurs und Wissensaustausch treffen.

Zur Konferenzwebseite: https://icis2019.aisconferences.org/

 Fri, 08. Nov. 2019   Daumann, Lars

Unser eingereichter Beitrag auf der ICIS 2019 wurde akzeptiert.

Darin behandeln wir die neuronale Aktivität im menschlichen Präfrontalen Cortex auf Shopping Webseiten. Wie wir dabei vorgangen sind und welche Ergebnisse erzielt wurden fasst der folgende Abstract gut zusammen:

"The investigation of user behavior in IS contexts is often conducted by utilizing self-report measurements. To complement these measurements, neuroscientific methods have indicated their potential for IS research. Most pioneering research work utilized fMRI as neuroimaging method, which is associated with a decreased ecological validity. To investigate whether mobile fNIRS-an innovative, portable and lightweight neuroimaging method-can overcome the limited ecological validity of fMRI, reproducing existing neuroscientific research results, this study aims to explore whether mobile fNIRS could be used as a valid neuroimaging method for IS research, or more precisely for ecommerce research. Preliminary research findings revealed that fNIRS is capable of partly reproducing pioneering research results. Consequently, fNIRS is found to be a reliable and valid neuroimaging method to increase the ecological validity in IS research in certain situations and circumstances, providing a fruitful new avenue to investigate IS research relevant scenarios."

Link zum Orginialtext: Utilizing Mobile fNIRS to Investigate Neural Correlates of the TAM in eCommerce