Anika Nissen

Academic Staff

Anika Nissen, M. Sc.

Room:
R09 R03 H18
Telephone:
+49 201 18-32847
Email:

Curriculum Vitae:

Since September 2018: Research Assistant at the Chair of Business Informatics and Integrated Information Systems at the University of Duisburg-Essen by Prof. Dr. Reinhard Schütte

December 2017 - August 2018: Research Aide at the Chair of Business Informatics and Integrated Information Systems at the University of Duisburg-Essen by Prof. Dr. Reinhard Schütte

Oktober 2015 - Juli 2018: Studies of Business Information Systems (M. Sc.) at the University Duisburg-Essen (passed with distinction)

  • Topic of Master Thesis: Measuring the Emotional Part of User Experience: Towards a Method to Guide Emotion Assessment in HCI

August 2016 – January 2017: Semester abroad at the Högskolan i Borås in Sweden

April 2016 – December 2017: Student Assistant at the Chair of Business Informatics and Integrated Information Systems at the University of Duisburg-Essen by Prof. Dr. Reinhard Schütte

October 2012 – July 2016: Studies of Business Information Systems (B. Sc.) at the University of Duisburg-Essen

  • Focus of Studies: IT-Management and E-Entrepreneurship
  • Topic of Bachelor Thesis: Decision Support in IT-Management: Evaluation Criteria for Performance Indicator Systems and Exemplary Application

Fields of Research:

  • User Experience (UX) measurement with psychophysiological methods
  • Implementation of neuroscientific methods in Information Systems research
  • Measuring effects of graphical user interface design and brands
  • Measuring customer experience in ecommerce and retail
  • Observation and analysis of human-robot interactions

Projects:

Publications:

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  • Nissen, A.: Psychological and Physiological Effects of Color Use on eCommerce Websites: a Neural Study Using fNIRS. In: International Conference on Information Systems (ICIS). Hyderabad, India 2020. CitationDetails

    Colors surround us in all life situations and have the power to influence our mood and emotions, which makes color a crucial impact factor for decision making in ecommerce environments. Therefore, this research paper aims to explore the psychological and physiological effects of color use on websites with a neuroimaging method. For this, an experiment was designed in which 24 healthy participants watched an online shoe shop in 4 different colored versions during which their neural activity in the prefrontal cortex was measured. While comparing the neural activity between the different employed colors, distinct implications can be derived. That is, in comparison to the blueish website, (1) grey scaled websites require higher cognitive load but are rated as aesthetically pleasing, (2) greenish websites result in more negative valence while they require not more neural resources, and (3) reddish websites are rated low in valence and require higher neural processing resources.

  • Jahn, K.; Nissen, A.: Towards Dual Processing of Social Robots: Differences in the Automatic and Reflective System. In: International Conference on Information Systems (ICIS). Hyderabad, India 2020. CitationDetails

    Social robots increasingly diffuse into our lives in work, health, and many other areas. However, theoretical approaches that explain how social robots should be designed to maximize experiential and performance-related outcomes in human-robot interaction (HRI) are still rare. To close this research gap, we aim to develop a dual process model of HRI with the help of two experiments. Results of the first experiment show that individuals categorize humans and robots differently in the automatic and reflective system, leading to different forms of robotic biases in these systems. Specifically, whereas humans show a bias against all types of robots in the reflective system, they only show biases against robots with low anthropomorphism in the automatic system. With the second experiment, we aim to complement these results from a neurophysiological perspective to gain more insights into cognitive processes during classification and evaluation of robots.

  • Nissen, A.: Why We Love Blue Hues on Websites: a fNIRS Investigation of Color and Its Impact on the Neural Processing of eCommerce Websites. In: Davis, F. D.; Riedl, R.; vom Brocke, J.; Léger, P-M.; Randolph, A.; Fischer, T. (Ed.): NeuroIS Retreat. Wien 2020. CitationDetails

    Blue of all colors seems to be generally preferred by humans and animals. Consequently, the use of this color in ecommerce context has several positive effects such as increased trustworthiness and aesthetic ratings. These effects are, in this study, hypothesized to be caused by specific neural processes in the prefrontal cortex of human decision makers. Consequently, this study tackles the research question whether there is a distinct neural activation pattern for blue websites that helps to explain why blue is often most favored. To investigate this, one website is designed and manipulated in col-or to which user reactions are measured by employing functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). The results of this study show that blue colored websites seem to require generally less processing power related to cognitive while revealing increases in brain structures related to processing pleasant and aesthetic stimuli.
     

  • Nissen, A.; Krampe, C.: Exploring Gender Differences on eCommerce Websites: A Behavioral and Neural Approach Utilizing fNIRS. In: Davis, F. D.; Riedl, R.; vom Brocke, J.; Léger, P-M.; Randolph, A.; Fischer, T. (Ed.): NeuroIS Retreat. Wien 2020. CitationDetails

    Whether males and females evaluate ecommerce websites differently has long been discussed and has resulted in inconsistent research findings. While some studies identified gender differences in the evaluation of websites, other studies indicate that these differences are inexistent. To shed light on these hypothetical gender differences on ecommerce website perceptions, a behavioral and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) experiment in which participants had to use and evaluate three different ecommerce websites was conducted. While the questionnaire-based behavioral results showed no significant differences between gender, neural gender differences could be discovered. In particular, well rated websites resulted in increased neural activity for men in brain regions of the dlPFC and vlPFC in the left hemisphere, while the lower evaluated websites resulted in an increased neural activity in brain regions of the vmPFC for men in the right hemisphere. Consequently, the results suggest that men seem to require higher neural activity for the emotional appraisal of, and decision making on ecommerce websites.

  • Nissen, A.: Exploring the Neural Correlates of Visual Aesthetics on Websites. In: Davis, Fred D.; Riedl, René; vom Brocke, Jan; Léger, Pierre-Majorique; Randolph, Adriane; Fischer, Thomas (Ed.): Information Systems and Neuroscience. Springer, Cham 2020, p. 211-220. doi:10.1007/978-3-030-28144-1_23CitationDetails
  • Nissen, Anika; Krampe, Caspar; Kenning, Peter; Schütte, Reinhard: Utilizing Mobile fNIRS to Investigate Neural Correlates of the TAM in eCommerce. In: International Conference for Information Systems (ICIS) (2019). CitationDetails
  • Nissen, A.; Jahn, K.: Between Anthropomorphism, Trust, and the Uncanny Valley: A Dual-Processing Perspective on Perceived Trustworthiness and Its Mediating Effects on Use Intentions of Social Robots. In: Proceedings of the 54th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS 2021). Maui, Hawaii . CitationDetails

    Designing social robots with the aim to increase their acceptance is crucial for the success of their implementation. However, even though increasing anthropomorphism is often seen as a promising way to achieve this goal, the uncanny valley effect proposes that anthropomorphism can be detrimental to acceptance unless robots are almost indistinguishable from humans. Against this background, we use a dual processing theory approach to investigate whether an uncanny valley of perceived trustworthiness (PT) can be observed for social robots and how this effect differs between the intuitive and deliberate reasoning system. The results of an experiment with four conditions and 227 participants provide support for the uncanny valley effect. Furthermore, mediation analyses suggested that use intention decreases through both reduced intuitive and deliberate PT for medium levels of anthropomorphism. However, for high levels of anthropomorphism (indistinguishable from real human), only intuitive PT determined use intention. Consequently, our results indicate both advantages and pitfalls of anthropomorphic design.

Talks:

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  • Nissen, A.: Assessing the Emotional Part of User Experience - Potential of Affective Computing Methods, Multikonferenz Wirtschaftsinformatik 2018, 07.03.2018, Leuphana, Lüneburg. Details

Tutored Theses:

  • User satisfaction in elearning: an analysis of relevant evaluation criteria (Bachelor Thesis Business Information Systems, in progress)
  • Analysis of the state of the art of brain computer interfaces and future application potential in the frame of business information systems (Bachelor Thesis Business Information Systems, in progress)
  • Impact of Dark Patterns on the User Experience in Social Networks (Bachelor Thesis Business Information Systems, in progress)
  • Analysis of the technology acceptance model as sufficient explanation model for consumer acceptance of smartwatches (Bachelor Thesis Business Information Systems)
  • The digital transformation and its influence on employees: An investigation of an exemplary digitization project of the innogy SE (Bachelor Thesis Business Information Systems)
  • Analysis of the Acceptance of Self-Service Technologies Using the Example of Self-Service Checkouts in the Retail Sector (Bachelor Thesis Business Information Systems)
  • The digital transformation and its influence on employees: An investigation of an exemplary digitization project of the innogy SE (Bachelor Thesis Business Information Systems)
  • User satisfaction in elearning: an analysis of relevant evaluation criteria (Bachelor Thesis Business Information Systems)
  • Creating a Future for Mobile Point-of-Sales: Construction of a DevOps based framework for Android development and exemplary application to a prototype (Bachelor Thesis Business Information Systems)
  • Development of an Acceptance Model for Applying Virtual Reality in Education Based on a Survey of Users (Bachelor Thesis Business Information Systems)
  • Visualization of huge datasets in buisness intelligence (Bachelor Thesis Business Information Systems)
  • Developing a method to analyse information security risks in the frame of IT services in retail companies (Bachelor Thesis Business Information Systems)
  • Analysis of behavioral changes of website users: a focus on the impact of color (Bachelor Thesis Business Information Systems)
  • The Internet of Things for smart parking lot systems: current technological status and awareness survey (Bachelor Thesis Business Information Systems)
  • Recommendations for Controlling Service Providers in the Context of Information Security and Exemplariy Application to a Food Retailer (Master Thesis Business Information Systems)
  • Analysis of enhancing CRM systems with comprehensive business analytic functions (Bachelor Thesis Business Administration)